Utah Mom Toilet Trains Her Tots at a Table in a Restaurant

Image: www.projectpottytraining.com

Those looking for the upside to the story could argue that the mother was the very picture of efficiency, killing two birds with one stone. Unfortunately, only one of those birds—eating lunch in a restaurant with your toddlers—is socially acceptable. The other—potty training them right at the table—is widely frowned upon.

CBS Las Vegas reports that Kimberly Decker, a customer at the Thanksgiving Point Deli in the town of Lehi, Utah, was enjoying her own lunch until she happened to catch a glimpse (or was it a whiff?) of the goings-on at a nearby table. Decker posted on her blog:

While we sat down to have lunch, I noticed this young Mother was potty training her two twin daughters at the table. It didn’t quite register at first what was happening, but when I took a second glance I realized this is NOT OK! I decided to snap a picture of the whole incident and then later that afternoon as a ‘joke’ I decided to post it on Facebook. I couldn’t believe the response I got.

Decker, who has three small children of her own, one of whom just finished potty training, initially assumed the twins were sitting on booster seats. Then she caught a glimpse of a naked baby butt.

“She had to undo the jumpsuits, and take them all the way down so they were completely nude, with the jumpsuits down to their ankles just eating their chicken nuggets, sitting on little toddler potties,” Decker told station KSL-TV, which picked up the story.

A spokeswoman for the restaurant with the remarkably apt name of Erica Brown told the station that the managed received several complaints over the incident. “I think state and local health codes were probably an issue, as well as just social norms,” she said.

The identities of the mother and children have not been revealed.

 

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